Tag Archives: math

Clouds: A Sensory Observation

CLOUD MAGIC Multidisciplinary STEAM Experience

eye in cloud

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to provide a shared sensory experience on which to build deep learning in the Sciences and the Arts. [Note: I presented this activity at the 2013 National Convention of the NAEYC.]

Suitability: This activity is adaptable to many levels. It works well with preschoolers through adults and is particularly suited for mixed ages or parent/child workshops. With small changes, it can be used one-on-one with an infant and adult or an adult with a two or three toddlers.

Integrated Learning: This plan is based on the Blank Multi-Sensory STEAM Planner

Click here for the Cloud Planner.  CLOUD STEAM PLanner

Standards

SCIENCE KS-ESS2 Earth’s Systems Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time.

TECHNOLOGY ISTE 3 Research & Information Fluency Apply digital tools to gather information, evaluate, and use information

ENGINEERING K-2-ETS1-2 Develop a simple model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function

ARTS NCSA Connecting Anchor Standard #10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experience to create artistic work.

MATHEMATICS  CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.A.1
Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

Objectives: Children will develop…

  • Socially by working with others.
  • Physically by using gross and fine motor skills and by positioning objects and their bodies in space.
  • Emotionally by identifying their own feelings.
  • Intellectually by working with size, distance, counting, and exploring cause and effect.
  • Linguistically by talking, reading, singing, and writing about their experiences.
  • Creatively by making their own choices of how to express what they are learning.
  • Perceptually by making meaning of sensory stimuli.
  • Artistically by using the elements of and applying the skills of visual art, music, dance, and drama.

WOW The Sensory Experience 

  • Provide the stimulus: On a cloudy day take the children outside and look up at the clouds. If possible, lie down on your backs. But standing up is fine too. Hold an infant in your arms and point up at the sky. The important thing is to be outside and look long distances to develop distance vision.
  • Attract attention and encourage active participation: Point to various clouds and use enthusiastic language and open-ended questions. “Look!” “I see a big cloud, small cloud, dark cloud, pink cloud, floating cloud, etc. What do you see?”  “Are they moving? Are they changing?”
  • Imitate their actions: When they point to something, mirror them.
  • Give feedback: Point to it and draw others attention to it. Be quiet and let the children share the experience of the clouds. Take plenty of time to allow children to sustain their focus. If children become distracted, draw them back with a question.
  • Add deep meaning through STEAM: Follow up the experience to enrich it: Go out at different times of day and check for TheCloudBookchanges. Go out on a foggy day or a fine drizzle, and talk about how you are inside a cloud. Ask: “How does it feel on your skin?” “How does it smell?” “How does it taste?” “What can you see?” “What can you hear?”  Read The Cloud Book by Tommie de Paola and  Cloud Dance by Thomas Locker. Make a list of words that describe clouds. Use the list to create a simple poem as illustrated.
Cloud DanceOur Clouds
Floating
Fluffy
Bouncing
High Up
Dancing clouds

Deepening the Experience and the Learning

1. Cloud sounds  Go outside on a windy day. “If clouds are moving fast across the sky what sounds do we hear?” Make wind sounds. Establish hand signals for louder and softer, faster and slower, higher and lower. Conduct the group in making wind music. Let children take turns conducting the group. Extend this activity byadding rhythm instruments and making paper cloud stick puppets as follows and moving them to the music.

2. Tissue paper “clouds”  Provide small squares of tissue paper about 8″ by 8.” For older children provide straws for blowing. Encourage children to explore the tissue using sensory questions: “How does it feel, smell, sound, move, look?” “How does it change if you crumble it up?” “What happens if you blow it?”  “How is the same as a cloud?” “How is it different?” As you ask your questions point to the tissue balls to focus attention. Extension:  Have children make more balls and put them in the sensory bin or encourage children to build from blocks or to draw (upper levels) mazes and using straws try to blow the “cloud” through the maze.

3. Cloud stick puppets/dancing props Attach the tissue ball to the top of a straw using scotch tape. Have children explore how their cloud will move. Holding their cloud puppet as a prop have them dance like clouds to “cloud” music of your choice. Music that relates well to cloud dancing are selections from The Grand Canyon Suite. Extension: Take the puppets outside and explore the shadows they make. Look for cloud shadows and try to stand in them. Inside provide flashlights and make cloud shadows and shadow puppet shows for each other.

4. Cloud songs  Select a familiar tune and make up words. Extend this activity by using cloud stick puppets to act out the actions of the cloud song. Here is an example based on Mary Has a Little Lamb.

I have a little cloud, little cloud, little cloud. I have a little cloud  ___________________ [Have children complete the words i.e. floating to and fro or dancing up and down, and it’s white and cold, etc.

5. Cloud Flip Mural Read Eric Carle’s Little Cloud. Go outside and see if you can see different things in the clouds. The Little CloudDiscuss how clouds can be all kinds of shapes. Give out two sheets of paper one small and one large. These can be white or cloud colors of your choice. Have children compare the sizes. Then have them cut out a cloud shape from each. Challenge older children by having them tear out the shapes. Ask: “Is one cloud bigger?” “Why or why not?” “Could you make other sizes from the left over pieces?” Add more math by having them put their clouds in size order, and count how many clouds the class made using multiples in the upper grades. Have children take turns gluing their larger clouds to a long sheet of paper – this can be white, painted in sky colors by the children, or be a long piece of tracing paper. The translucence of tracing paper creates a glowing sky effect. Attach a string to the smaller clouds using scotch tape. Tape these to the mural.  NOW: Take the two ends and flip it over. The clouds on strings will hang down. Suspend it between two tables by taping each end to the edge. Put fluffy pillows underneath and create a place for children to curl up with a book and dream or count clouds.

6. Under a Cloud. Use a paper or tissue cloud attached to a string. It could be the one made for the mural before it is attached or a separate one created just for this activity. Have children think about how their cloud feels. Share ideas. Ask: “How would your cloud move if it were happy or sad or tired?”  Read the book The Cloud  by Hannah Cumming. Talk about why the illustrator made a cloud scribble over the girls’ head. Ask: “What other ways could her friend have helped her?”The Cloud

 

7. Cloud Stories Invent stories about clouds. A good example is The Cloud Spinner by Michael Catchpool in which a little boy spins cloth from the clouds.

Cloud Flip Mural made by participants in the NAEYC conference workshop

What other cloud activities can you think of to deepen the learning?

Flying Ghosts: Observing, Predicting, and Testing

DSC03425

This science-math-arts lesson starts off with the following story.

Now we all know that there are no ghosts in real life, but we can make ghosts out of paper.

Once upon a time there were three little paper ghosts. (Cut out a paper ghost) like this one. These ghosts just loved to fly around. Each had a special way to fly. The first ghost would spin round and round as he flew. (spin you hand)The second ghost loved to zip back and forth as he floated. (wave hand back and forth) The third ghost like to jump up and then come straight back down feet (or sometimes) head first. (drop hand fast) One day they decided to teach each other how to do each one’s special flying technique. But try as they might they always flew in their own special way.

Why do you think that was so?

PROCEDURE

WOW A story followed by a demonstration of flying paper ghosts

OBJECTIVES Children will observe, ask questions, make predictions, and design tests. They will group and  graph their test data. CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.B.3 CCSS.Math.Content.1.MD.C.4 CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.D.10

MATERIALS Half sheets of typing type paper, pencils, scissors, paper clips, chart paper.

How will you make your paper ghost look?

OBERVATION

During the story, cut out a ghost shape while noting that since ghosts are imaginary, they can be any shape we want them to be. Purposely make yours oddly shaped. Now let the ghost fly by holding it over your head and letting go.

QUESTION

  • Next ask: How did it fly? Have them share their observations. Repeat several flights. Does it always fly in the same way? How could we change the a ghost flies? What shape do you think would spin? What would make it fall faster?
  • Record their ideas of other ways to make the ghosts.

Paper ghosts can be any shape.

TEST

Give out paper and scissors and let them test their ideas by making ghost shapes and letting them fly. (Provide an open area like a rug or outside for the testing). Put out paper clips for those who want to try adding weight.

Let go and see how it flies.

RECORD DATA

Make several columns on chart paper, board, or an interactive white board. On top of each columns write a way to fly such as spin, flip, float, and drop, Have extra columns to add any other moves they observe. After each test they should put a tally mark in the column that best matches how their shape flew most often. For preschool, you can have them place their ghosts in the proper column using tape or lay them out on a chart on the floor.

CONCLUSION

Study the graph. Count tally marks or ghosts. Study their shapes. What did we learn about how paper ghosts fly? Which shape spins the most? Which floats? Does the paper clips change how it flies? Does size make a difference? What other tests could we do?

EXTENSION 

Explore making ghosts with different size and types of paper.

STEAM IT UP

Infuse the arts by suggesting they make a collage using their ghosts.

How do you think this ghost will fly?

Sunflowers: A Science & Math Observation Lab

sunflower headScientists use their senses to observe and formulate questions.

In this lesson a first grade class observes sunflower heads.

WOW [Wonderful Object of Wonder]: 5 large sunflower heads and 1 sunflower still on its stem.

Objectives:  Children will name their senses and then use them to make observations and create questions (Linguistic, physical, cognitive, and creative development). Children will estimate the number of seeds in a flower head and then count them. They will estimate the height of the sunflower plant and measure it (Common Core: CCSS.Math.Content.1.NBT.A.1; CCSS.Math.Content.1.MD.A.2)

Presentation: Sit children in small groups and set a sunflower head before them. Ask the following questions and allow time for every child to share his or her ideas several times.

OBSERVATION

What can we observe about sunflowers?

…with our eyes

  • What colors do we see?
  • What shapes do we see?
  • How many do we see?

looking

“The seeds are striped.” “They’re white and black.” “And gray and brown.” “The leaves are green and brown.” “There are yellow things like cups where the seeds have fallen out.” “There are fuzzy things on the seeds.” “There’s thousands of seeds.”

…with our fingers

  • Is it wet, dry or both?
  • Is it hard, soft, smooth, bumpy or all of these?
  • Does it stay together or fall apart?

touching

“Feels hard and bumpy.” “Loose. the seeds are loose.” “The brown part on the outside falls apart.” “Ugh. This part is wet.” “I can put my finger through it.” “Feels curvy like a funny shape ball.”

…with our noses

  • Does it smell strong or not very much?
  • Does it smell like something you have smelled before?
  • Does it smell nice or yucky?

Smelling

“Smells like chocolate milk.” Like dirt.” “Tickles my nose.” “Smells fuzzy.” Smells like a rainy day.” “Smells like wet paper.” “Good. It smells good.” “I like how it smells.” “Yuck. I don’t think so.”

…with our ears

  • Without moving or touching it, does it make any noise?
  • Does it make a noise when you touch it?
  • When might it make noise?

listening

“I don’t hear anything.” “It’s quiet.”  “It’s just sitting there.””It crinkles when I touch it.” “It’s like dead.” “Sounds like paper.” “It would make noise in the wind, I think.”

ASK QUESTIONS

DSC03419Solicit questions: Next gather child-generated questions and list on board or chart paper.

  • Is it alive? (the seed)
  • How does it get so big from such a little seed?
  • How tall is it?
  • What are these little yellow and brown flower things?
  • How many seeds are there?
  • Do they blow over in the wind?
  • Can we plant them [the seeds] now?

how tallMAKE PREDICTIONS

Have children make predictions for each question

TEST

Together with the children devise tests and do research to find the answers to the children’s questions.

For example: Set up a center where the children can remove all the seeds from a sunflower head and count them. At another center put out the different measuring tools and the sunflower on its stalk to find out how tall it is. Provide cups and dirt and plant some of the seeds to find out if they are alive. Put out books about sunflowers and find information on the web.

RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS

After all children have had an opportunity to explore the centers, share what they have learned, have them share with the whole group.

NEW QUESTIONS

Find out what new questions they have and make a list.

DSC03405STEAM IT UP: INFUSE THE ARTS

  • Draw pictures of the sunflowersDSC03422
  • Make up a sunflower song or poem or story
  • Do a sunflower dance
  • Make sunflower seed pictures
  • Pantomime a sunflower seed growing into a sunflower plant

SUNFLOWER FACTS

  • The scientific name for a sunflower is Helianthus., which is Greek for Sun Flower.
  • They are one of the fastest growing plants.
  • The tallest sunflower was 25.6 feet tall.
  • The sunflower is native to North America and was used as food by the Native Americans.
  • Each sunflower head is made up of 1000 to 2000 flowers which turn into the seeds.
  • The sunflower is a heliotrope, which means it follows the sun as it crosses the sky each day.
  • Oil is made from black sunflower seeds. Snacks are made from white striped ones. You have to crush break open the outer shell to find the edible seed inside.

SUNFLOWER CHILDREN’S BOOKS

A Big Yellow Sunflower by Frances Barry

From Seed to Sunflower by Gerald Legg

Sunflower House by Eve Bunting

This is a Sunflower by Lola Schaefer

sunflower lift