Tag Archives: Art

Measurement Lab: Observing Beets

beet4In this observation lab students are introduced to basic measuring tools: metric ruler, metric tape measure, balance scale and gram weights. The example lesson is drawn from a second grade class who have been presented with fresh beets to observe. However, this lesson can be done at any grade level using any type of engaging object that has measurable variability within a shared unity of appearance or form, such as apples, clam shells, corncobs, feathers, hot wheel cars, keys, leaves, lemons, nuts, seeds, pumpkins, rocks, worms, and so on. The lesson objects should be close to the same size. There should be one object for each child.

PROCEDURE

OBJECTIVES: Students will review using their senses to make observations. They will practice using measuring tools and saying and recording metric units of measure. This lesson meets these standards for Grade 2.

  • CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.A.1 Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.A.4 Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length difference in terms of a standard length unit.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.D.10 Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems1 using information presented in a bar graph.
  • 2 PS-1-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties. [Clarification Statement: Observations could include color, texture, hardness, and flexibility. Patterns could include the similar properties that  different materials share.]

beet9PREPARATION

At stations around the room have set up a sensory observation table with hand lenses, a weigh station with scales and gram weights, a length stations with rulers, and a circumference table with tape measures. Have one large table where the objects can be laid out to form a physical graph on graph paper.

OBSERVE

WOW: Place chosen objects in front of the children and ask them to observe using the sensory observation lab procedure – first using their eyes, then their other senses. Elicit this observation by asking questions that draw on their memories of the sensory observation lab.

ASK QUESTIONS

Ask: Which one is the biggest? How do we know? Introduce the measuring tools. Demonstrate how to use each one to get an accurate measurement.beet10

MAKE PREDICTIONS

Next ask each child to select an object and predict its size. Record their predictions.

TEST

Their task is to go to each center to observe and measure the object.

beets1RECORD RESULTS

They are to record their results on their lab sheet. [Measurement Lab Sheet] After they have observed and measured their objects, they should place them on the graph paper from biggest to smallest.

COME TO A CONCLUSION

Discuss how they decided to order them. Did they use length, width, depth, mass,  circumference or use a combination? Does it make a difference? How does using the tools help them decide where to place them? Make bar graphs using the different ways to measure.

NEW QUESTIONS

Does the type of object affect how one measures it? Try measuring other objects.

Does it make a difference what unit of measurement is used? Try standard measures or make up your own units.

STEAM IT UP: INFUSE THE ARTS

Infuse the arts by showing students examples of scientists’ journals such as Nicky the Nature Detective and Journal of Inventions: Leonardo da Vinci and having children DSC03777draw detailed illustrations of their object in their journals using regular and colored pencil.

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Flying Ghosts: Observing, Predicting, and Testing

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This science-math-arts lesson starts off with the following story.

Now we all know that there are no ghosts in real life, but we can make ghosts out of paper.

Once upon a time there were three little paper ghosts. (Cut out a paper ghost) like this one. These ghosts just loved to fly around. Each had a special way to fly. The first ghost would spin round and round as he flew. (spin you hand)The second ghost loved to zip back and forth as he floated. (wave hand back and forth) The third ghost like to jump up and then come straight back down feet (or sometimes) head first. (drop hand fast) One day they decided to teach each other how to do each one’s special flying technique. But try as they might they always flew in their own special way.

Why do you think that was so?

PROCEDURE

WOW A story followed by a demonstration of flying paper ghosts

OBJECTIVES Children will observe, ask questions, make predictions, and design tests. They will group and  graph their test data. CCSS.Math.Content.K.MD.B.3 CCSS.Math.Content.1.MD.C.4 CCSS.Math.Content.2.MD.D.10

MATERIALS Half sheets of typing type paper, pencils, scissors, paper clips, chart paper.

How will you make your paper ghost look?

OBERVATION

During the story, cut out a ghost shape while noting that since ghosts are imaginary, they can be any shape we want them to be. Purposely make yours oddly shaped. Now let the ghost fly by holding it over your head and letting go.

QUESTION

  • Next ask: How did it fly? Have them share their observations. Repeat several flights. Does it always fly in the same way? How could we change the a ghost flies? What shape do you think would spin? What would make it fall faster?
  • Record their ideas of other ways to make the ghosts.

Paper ghosts can be any shape.

TEST

Give out paper and scissors and let them test their ideas by making ghost shapes and letting them fly. (Provide an open area like a rug or outside for the testing). Put out paper clips for those who want to try adding weight.

Let go and see how it flies.

RECORD DATA

Make several columns on chart paper, board, or an interactive white board. On top of each columns write a way to fly such as spin, flip, float, and drop, Have extra columns to add any other moves they observe. After each test they should put a tally mark in the column that best matches how their shape flew most often. For preschool, you can have them place their ghosts in the proper column using tape or lay them out on a chart on the floor.

CONCLUSION

Study the graph. Count tally marks or ghosts. Study their shapes. What did we learn about how paper ghosts fly? Which shape spins the most? Which floats? Does the paper clips change how it flies? Does size make a difference? What other tests could we do?

EXTENSION 

Explore making ghosts with different size and types of paper.

STEAM IT UP

Infuse the arts by suggesting they make a collage using their ghosts.

How do you think this ghost will fly?